Universities for GRE score 280 290

Universities for GRE score 280 290

Universities for GRE score 280 290

Universities for GRE score 280 290

These are the few Low GRE Scores Universities which accepts  low GRE scores, so students can get easy admission in one of the following universities.

If you need any further information do comment in the comment box below.

Low GRE Scores Universities

Temple University, PA www.temple.edu 
City College of the City of New York www.cuny.edu 
Northeastern Illinois University www.neiu.edu 
University of Detroit Mercy www.udmercy.edu 
University of Arkansas Little Rock www.ualr.edu 
California State University, Fresno www.csufresno.edu 
Alabama A & M University www.aamu.edu 
Widener University, Pennsylvania www.widener.edu
Alcorn State University www.alcorn.edu 
Gannon University www.gannon.edu 
University of Findlay-Ohio www.findlay.edu
San Diego State University, California www.sdsu.edu

 

Universities for GRE score 290 +

Universities for GRE score 280 290

 

Ball State University www.bsu.edu 
Northwestern Polytechnic University www.npu.edu 
Jacksonville State University www.jsu.edu 
Saint Joseph University www.sju.edu 
Chapman University www.chapman.edu 
Kent State University www.kent.edu 
Ferris State University www.ferris.edu 
University of New Haven, CT www.newhaven.edu 
Farleigh Dickinson University, New Jersey www.fdu.edu 
State University of New York, Albany www.albany.edu 
College of William & Mary www.wm.edu 
East Tennessee State University www.etsu.edu 
Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos www.swt.edu 
DePaul University www.depaul.edu 
Mc Neese State University www.mcneese.edu 
Oakland University www.oakland.edu 
Sam Houston State University www.shsu.edu 
San Jose state University www.sjsu.edu 
William Patterson University www.wpunj.edu 
Western Carolina University www.wcu.edu 
University of Central Oklahoma www.ucok.edu 
Widener University www.widener.edu 
University of St Thomas, MN www.stthomas.edu 
Western Illinois university www.wiu.edu 
Bowling Green State University, Ohio www.bgsu.edu 
Delaware State University www.desu.edu
State University of New York, New Paltz www.newpaltz.edu 
Central Michigan University www.cmich.edu 
University of Southern Mississippi www.usm.edu 
Indian University South Bend www.iusb.edu 
Saint Mary’s University San Antonio www.stmarytx.edu 
Shippensburg University, PA www.ship.edu 
East Tennessee State University www.etsu.edu 
University of Texas, Pan America www.panam.edu 
Jackson State University www.jsums.edu 
Oklahoma City University www.ocu.edu 
Frostburg State University www.frostburg.edu 
La Salle University, PA www.lasalle.edu 
Alfred University www.alfred.edu 
Monmouth University-New Jersey www.monmouth.edu
Southern New Hampshire University www.snhu.edu 
Roosevelt University Chicago www.roosevelt.edu 
Drake university www.drake.edu 
Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania www.ship.edu 
Duquesne University www.duq.edu 
Georgia College & State University www.gcsu.edu 
Georgia Southern University www.georgiasouthern.edu
Kennesaw State University www.kennesaw.edu 
Long Island University www.liu.edu 
Loyola University Chicago www.luc.edu 
Northern Kentucky University www.nku.edu 
Lawrence Tech University www.ltu.edu 
Clark Atlanta University www.cau.edu 
California State University, Northridge www.csun.edu 
Catholic University of America, Washington www.cua.edu
Ohio Dominican College (University), Ohio www.ohiodominican.edu 
Ferris State University, Michigan www.ferris.edu
Fitchburg State University, MA www.fsc.edu 
Hawaii Pacific University, Hawaii www.hpu.edu

 

Universities for GRE score 280 290

 

Northwood University, Michigan www.northwood.edu 
Johnson and Wales University, RI www.jwu.edu
Governors State University, Parkway IL www.govst.edu 
Troy State University, Alabama www.troyst.edu 
Stevens Institute of Technology www.stevens-tech.edu 
Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton www.fau.edu 
Golden Gate University www.ggu.edu 
Howard University www.howard.edu 
Dominican University www.dom.edu 

Universities for GRE score 280 290

 

One comment

  • Danielpoity

    ?Editing the Essay, Part Just one
    Anyone who has gone through the ecstasies and agonies of producing an essay knows the satisfaction (and occasionally the sadness) of finishing. Once you’ve done all the do the trick of figuring out what you wish to say, arriving at an arguable and interesting thesis, analyzing your evidence, organizing your ideas, and contending with counter-arguments, you may truly feel that you’ve got nothing left to do but run spell-check, print it out and await your professor’s response. But what spell- check can’t discern is what real readers may well think or sense when they read through your essay: where they will probably become confused, or annoyed, or bored, or distracted. Anticipating those responses is the job of an editor-the job you take on as you edit your very own get the job done.
    As you proceed, remember that now and then what may look like a compact problem can mask (be a symptom of) a larger one particular. A poorly-worded phrase-one that would seem, say, unclear or vague-may just would need some tweaking to fix; but it surely may indicate that your thinking hasn’t developed fully yet, that you’re not extremely sure what you ought to say. Your language may be vague or confusing on the grounds that the idea itself is. So learning, as Yeats says, to “cast a cold eye” on your prose isn’t just a matter of arranging the finishing touches on your essay. It’s about making your essay superior from the inside (clarifying and deepening your ideas and insights) and from the outside the house (expressing those ideas in powerful, lucid, graceful prose). These 5 guidelines can help.
    1. Study your essay aloud. When we labor over sentences, we can usually lose sight in the larger picture, of how all the sentences sound when they’re browse speedily 1 after the opposite, as your readers will look at them. If you check out aloud, your ear will pick up a number of the problems your eye could very well miss.
    As you examine your essay, remember the “The Princess plus the Pea,” the story of the princess so sensitive she was bothered by an individual pea buried beneath the pile of mattresses she lay upon. As an editor, you intend to be like the princess-highly alert to anything that would seem slightly odd or “off” as part of your prose. So if something strikes you as problematic, don’t gloss over it. Investigate to uncover the nature in the problem. Chances are, if something bothers you a minor, it will bother your readers a lot.
    two. Make sure all of your words are doing important deliver the results in making your argument. Are all of your words and phrases necessary? Or are they just taking up house? Are your sentences tight and sharp, or are they loose and dull? Don’t say in three sentences what you might say in a single, and don’t use 14 words where 5 will do. You would like every word inside of your sentence to increase as considerably meaning and inflection as achievable. As you see phrases like “My have personal opinion,” ask yourself what “own personal” adds. Isn’t that what “my” signifies?
    Even minor, apparently unimportant words like “says” are worth your attention. Instead of “says,” could you make use of a word like argues, acknowledges, contends, believes, reveals, suggests, or statements? Words like these not only make your sentences added lively and interesting, they furnish useful help and advice: any time you tell your readers that someone “acknowledges” something, that deepens their understanding of how or why he or she claimed that thing; “said” merely reports.
    3. Keep in mind the concept of le mot juste . Always try to obtain the perfect words, essentially the most precise and precise language, to say what you mean. Without working with concrete, clear language, you can’t convey to your readers exactly what you think about a subject; you could only speak in generalities, and all people has by now heard those: “The evils of society are a drain on our resources.” Sentences like this could mean so various things that they conclude up meaning nothing in the least to your readers-or meaning something very different from what you intended. Be special: What evils? Which societies? What resources? Your readers are reading your words to see what you think, what you must say.
    If you’re having trouble putting your finger on just the right word, consult a thesaurus, but only to remind yourself of your possible choices. Never choose words whose connotations or usual contexts you don’t really understand. Making use of language you’re unfamiliar with can lead to way more imprecision-and that can lead your reader to question your authority.
    four. Beware of inappropriately elevated language-words and phrases that are stilted, pompous, or jargony. Every now and then, in an effort to sound greater reliable or authoritative, or added sophisticated, we puff up our prose with this sort of language. Usually we only finish up sounding like we’re trying to sound smart-which is a really sure sign to our readers that we’re not. For those who notice yourself inserting words or phrases since you think they’ll sound impressive, reconsider. If your ideas are high-quality, you don’t must have to strain for impressive language; if they’re not, that language won’t help anyway.
    Inappropriately elevated language can result from nouns being applied as verbs. Most parts of speech functionality better-more elegantly-when they enjoy the roles they had been meant to perform; nouns deliver the results effectively as nouns and verbs as verbs. Go through the following sentences aloud, and listen to how pompous they sound.
    He exited the room. It is important that proponents and opponents of this bill dialogue about its contents before voting on it.
    Exits and dialogues give good results far better as nouns and there are plenty of ways of expressing those ideas without turning nouns into verbs.
    He left the room. People should discussion the pros and cons of this bill before voting.
    Every now and then, though, this serves as a rule worth breaking, as in “He muscled his way to the front in the line.” “Muscled” gives us a lot of tips that may otherwise take several words or even sentences to express. And for the reason that it’s not awkward to study, but lively and descriptive, readers won’t mind the temporary shift in roles as “muscle” becomes a verb.
    5. Be tough on your most dazzling sentences. As you revise, you may locate that sentences you needed in earlier drafts no longer belong-and these may be the sentences you’re most fond of. We’re all guilty of trying to sneak in our favorite sentences where they don’t belong, due to the fact we can’t bear to cut them. But perfect writers are ruthless and will throw out brilliant lines if they’re no longer relevant or necessary. They know that readers will be less struck by the brilliance than by the inappropriateness of those sentences and they let them go.
    Copyright 1999, Kim Cooper, for your Creating Center at Harvard University

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